UX Engineer Chris Gibbons

Dealing with rejection

“A rejection is nothing more than a necessary step in the pursuit of success” - Bo Bennett.

I’m not going to go into the full details, but twice in the space of 4 weeks I’ve been left having to deal with some kind of rejection.

Now this isn’t a post wanting pity, it’s more to serve as a permanent reminder to me, personally, on how I’ve dealt with it, and also something which may help others.

How people deal with things varies massively, some people can brush it aside easily and get on with things like nothing has happened, for others rejection can be a huge setback and something that they may take incredibly to heart – me? Well I like to think that i’m closer to the former.

Upon taking the phone call, I knew instantly of the outcome. I felt the full mixed bag of emotions – anger, upset, pity, nausea; I felt my heart racing, feeling like it was literally about to burst out of my chest in a scene reminiscent of Alien.

Words stared to collide with each other into some inaudible haze.

I got of the phone and tried to work as best as I could, but I just couldn’t.

Those close to me knew something was up, yet I spurned their advances to talk. I felt myself becoming insular. Then I thought I was going to vomit.

After gathering my thoughts, I took myself off somewhere quiet to reflect on things. Trying as best I could to recall the conversation, I quickly tried to make notes, brain dumping as I went. Suddenly I felt the cloud starting to lift.

I re-read my notes and tried to make a cohesive plan from them, it seemed to work, and on the train home that very night I made a start.

Update

It’s been about a month since the call and things have settled down. I still run things around in my head, still trying to figure out what I may have done wrong, always seemingly second guessing what actually went on, yet never fully figuring it out.

The one thing I am glad about, however, is the fact I proactively reflected and made notes.

Why?

Simply put, had I not put myself through that extra hour or two of toil and emotion, then I wouldn’t have the permanent reminder that I have now. I have some tangible thoughts to work towards.

More importantly I have a goal.

This page was last updated on 12th July 2016